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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 370 (some duplicates have been removed)
telling to your member of congress. >> two other things. on the department of education side think they will work on the mess, and hope we do a better job with the servicers reining in the problems. it is important that they have it is important that they have been hearing about this problem so much. that is one thing that does not require congressional action. another thing is the consumer financial protection bureau is sort of the new game in town as far as this goes. people do not think of them as a federal student loan side, they primarily have jurisdiction over private student loans. there will be quite active, talking about some of the predatory practices, but even on the federal student loan side the consumer financial protection bureau has jurisdiction over debt collectors and some of the servicers. it is not the biggest picture issues we have been talking about so much, but on the ground for people right now who have already borrowed, clients like mine having the existing programs that work well, it is incredibly important. hopefully a lot is going to happen in that area.
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
, education, and leadership. our president is one of the co-chairs of the council. it is my great pleasure to introduce him this evening. he is a scholar, advocate, and a true friend of afghanistan. pls -- [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and your work as vice chair of the u.s. afghan women's council. i wish to thank the members from the delegation from afghanistan, u.s. afghan women's council and all of our guests from around the world for joining us this evening. it is a privilege to welcome back to georgetown the president of afghanistan hamid karzai. we look forward to hearing his remark on afghanistan beyond 2014, a perspective on afghan-u.s. relations. 2014 will be an historic year for afghanistan as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through th
of a strong-handed role in sort of picking winners and losers in determining who gets educated and how they get educated -- those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate. and i think we have to recognize that if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with inequality or the inability to create jobs or the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else, we're going to lose our influence, the model's going to change, and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what's china doing right? >> guest: well, they're growing fast. that helps. by 2030, you know, china's second biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy, but really their growth has been internal. by 2030, which is not that long away although it sounds far away, they'll be the world's largest consumer economy. they'll be the ones setting the trend in terms of what a car is like and what a washing machine is like can and what an ipad is like. but they're also building more cities than anybody else. they're g
transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states. intimate reform was not addressed, and no action was taken regarding the federal
not addressing the costs of education at all. it is about increasing government funding to help students go to school. we need to be focusing on and we need to be focusing on what are the costs that can be reduced to bring these costs down, make schools more competitive, so students have a competitive choice of which university to go to. >> we will let you go, as we hear from traunch mitchell. -- josh mitchell. >> a lot of schools are starting to increase things at a faster pace. i think there is so much scrutiny these days. it is kind of like health care. why are costs rising? i think they're going to start to see a lot of pressure from congress to rein in their costs. >> josh mitchell writes for "the wall street journal," and thanks for spending the last half hour with us. >> yes. >> and we appreciate all of your phone calls, comments on twitter, and the conversation continues online, and the question we have been asking is, how much debt is worth going into college? [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013
. >>> the pakistani teenager nearly killed for her push for girls' education rights now back with her family, but will she be returning to pakistan to continue her fight? the latest on malhala's story coming up. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. take long. i'm done. are you thinking what i'm thinking? ♪ give me just a little more time ♪ okay. all right. oh! [ female announcer ] the 2-in-1 swiffer sweeper uses electrostatic dry cloths to clean better than a broom. and its wet mopping cloths can clean better than a mop in half the time so you don't miss a thing. mom, have you seen my -- hey! hey! he did it. [ female announcer ] swiffer. better clean in half the time. or your money back. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you g
perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of the appropriations committee. how that will change, we will see. we have more and more -- patty murray, dianne feinstein. these are significant changes. very interesting on the house side. we have seven women ranking on major committees and the house. the house republicans have zero women cheering any major committees. they are all white men and have one woman chairing a minor committee and that is the administration committee. we feel we are in a great place. froml see a lot of work emily's list to get the majority of back in the house. host: what role did your organization plate in the election of these women? guest: we are in it for the long haul. emily's list has been working with some women since they were in the state leg
been 10 years since the government introduced free primary education, but that has not solved all the problems. the un says more than one million children between six and 18 are still not in school. 30% of those live in slums. even those who do get to school do not always learn more than one/-- 1/4 of what they are supposed to learn. it is estimated kenyon needs 60,000 more staff. >> i am here at olympic primary school in one of the world are just slums. many of the parents of these children are casual laborers, earning just a few dollars per day. primary education is supposed to be free for all. parents have to pay for uniforms, textbooks, pencils, paper. let me take you into one of the classrooms. there are more than 3000 children here, but only 28 teachers. that is why the kids here are waiting to be taught. there is no teacher here to teach them. .> the government doesn't help we have to pay very high taxes. when you want your kid admitted to school, you have to pay a price. >> as a mother, i choose to bring my son to the free government school because it is good, because the
and killed. >> in tonight's education alert, for the fifth consecutive year, maryland ranked the no. 1 school system in the nation according to "education week" magazine. tim tooten has the story we first brought you today. this is getting to be old hat, isn't it? >> martineau mallee -- martin o'malley taking on critics of the school's success. >> we students show our appreciation by working hard. >> it was a celebration of the state's new ranking at the jones elementary school. that is when governor martin o'malley showed up to celebrate. >> as a result of our top choices, maryland public schools have been named for the fifth year in a row the number one public schools in america. maryland received an overall grade of b-plus. an a for transition and alignment, which tests college readiness and childhood education. a b for maths. among other grades, a b for k-12 achievement, which tracks all students perform on national tests. a b for standards, assessments, and accountability programs. >> it is just wonderful. is -- it is historic for our educators. >> maryland is among those celebrating the
and replenish our beaches. our department of education has worked night and day to get schools reopened right away, and where that wasn't possible, to get them restored by the next school year, all while maintaining our commitment to a full 180-day school year of education for our kids. executive order 107 makes sure that when insurance payments do come, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles and ensures that our citizens maximize their reimbursement. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the miracle of route 35 in mantoloking. at the mantoloking bridge, route 35 had been completely washed away by sandy. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flowed into the bay where route 35 once carried thousands of cars a day to vacations down the shore. within days, commissioner jim simpson, the department of transportation and our private sector partners had a temporary road built to allow emergency vehicles onto the island. now, merely 10 weeks after our state's worst storm, you see a perma
. >> in tonight's education alert, maryland schools continue their winning streak. they were named number one in the nation for the fifth year in our wrote. the system got a final grade of b-plus, but received no marks lower than a b. state school officials say there's still plenty of room for improvement. the top honor for a maryland scientist from the white house. >> he is one of 12 researchers been awarded this year's national medal of science. tim tooten is live in the newsroom with that story. big news for him, sam. >> he is a distinguished professor of physics, but his resume also includes a seat on the state board of education. the national medal of science from the white house is one of the highest honors given to scientists, engineers, and inventors. dr. gates is the author of more than 200 publications. he has been a member of the state school board since 2009. he says it is a nice surprise. >> the personal meaning i take from it is in order to get this sort of recognition, some of the world's best physicists had to support the research program i had been pursuing. that kind of affi
mentioned. perhaps better voter education about the tools that are out there to help them know where they need to vote, more staffing at the polling places where a captain or assistant captain could actually go through the front lines, the czech and lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone -- checkin lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone got any questions? i can check for you. that has become a real issue with all of the precincts. so come up voter education might be part of it, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells
months after the taliban tried to kill her for advocating education for girls. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year
of education executive order. roosevelt interned japanese americans. so, there's a lot of -- reagan by the way, banned abortions in military hospitals. executive order. so a lot of big policies have started out as executive orders, but overruling the second amendment, it's a tough concept. >> he can't say i ban -- do a new assault weapons ban or something like that? >> he can't do that. he has power of the executive branch. and he can, i can come up with ways that he can do it. he could ban the military from participating in sporting events with the nra where these assault rifles are used. he could ban funding of certain programs. there are ways he can work around the edges of gun control, but i cannot see how he would ban weapons outright. >> first of all, reality check. an executive order cannot supersede the constitution. so everyone just chill out. we have a lot of record as paul just said, of executive orders being done -- w. had 291 executive orders. again, reality check. in terms of what the president could do, in some ways, it's consistent with what the nra calls for. three things the
-to-day basis. this library is a model of educating young people. it is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drives them to be candid with john burns says. thank you so much for your work. [applause] >> thank you for keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who has spent a lifetime serving this country. she continues to be active and playable here at the library. i couldn't come here and not mention her for at least a moment. governor, we have done a lot of things over the years. from the mayor to u.s. senator governor, i look to them as great people who have a willingness to serve their country. it is always a family engagement if you're out there. thank you both for serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's wonderful to be back here. [applause] >> i didn't know you'd be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched what we call an american legacy book tour. we are very fond of the library, as you know. we made a movie about ronald reagan and i would like to recognize tonight kevin and his wife. he was the
. >> was different? do you think that educators should allow more choice among the young [inaudible question] >> this is a fascinating question we could spend an hour on. must public-school education, that's what you are suggesting. i know that's what you're suggesting. [laughter] >> okay. one of the things that i have found, and i only took over this in recent years. i have gone over certain things. in high school i was exposed to stuff the bored me to death at the time. thirty or for 40 years later, i remember it with vividness. and then we have an appreciation i can still remember the night watch. canterbury tales by chaucer. all of these things that our children need to be exposed to and not just how i pass this math and science tests. how i get through the next day. it would be a shame we don't expose our children to the right things and give them greater choice with what they want to do with their life. most of them at that age are not sure. sooner or later, something will touch them. i know where i'd be if my life and have been a pattern of 17. keep looking for the thing that you'd do
is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will police the power of everyone, -- you unleash the power of everyone, not just some, and there was great wisdom in afghanistan ratifying a constitution that recognizes that appeared that should be part of the legacy of these last 10 years. thank you very much, everybody. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> also this afternoon, vice president biden continuing his meetings today comeuppance together a response to last month's shootings at the connecticut elementary school. he is meeting this afternoon with representatives of the video game industry. he said yesterday he will have recommendations to the president next week. we want to hear again from hamas karzai this afternoon. he will be at georgetown university talking about the future of u.s.-afghan relations. that is live at 5:30 eastern on cnn. u.s. army colonel michael meese spoke earlier this week about kevin terrorism. he is a f
and he only been working at goodyear just a little over one year. he had less education unless experience. and he already made $600 more a month than i did from a lower paying job. the judge calculated my two years backpay, and i was given 30,000 per year. so i left the courtroom with $360,000. the headlines said from california to chicago to new york and florida, all across this nation -- the headlines read jacksonville, alabama, woman awarded $3.8 million from goodyear tire and rubber. they say that i got that money. the gadsden headline said that as well. i got a lot of compliments of the headlines in the news. well, that was 2003. he went to the 11th circuit record and then my guilt was hurt in the supreme court in november of 2006. life goes on. we had our normal family life the best we could do. but i worked the case just like it was a job. i called over 100 people to find the people that we needed to testify on my behalf. people were afraid of losing their jobs. they were so afraid. that is why they switched over. most of this was color coded. but life went on and my husband had tw
the state budget proposal an hour ago. the big winner in the budget plan is public education which will get more than $2.5 billion extra to fund k-12 and community college education. the uc and csu systems get an additional $250 million each. it calls for change to the program that transfers long-term care if adults to counties. the governor is calling for $1 billion reserve fund. brown said the state must still live in its means. >> i am here to get done what is compassionate, what is good for the state of california, and what we can maintain over time rather than just enjoying the momentary high. >> the state still faces a $1.9 billion deficit but brown will benefit from voter-approved tax increases and austerity measures forcing deep cuts to all state services during the last budget cycle. >> right now in washington, president obama has officially nominated jack lew for treasury secretary. that announcement was made last than half an hour ago. he is if line to replace geithner. last year, he was chosen to be the president's chief of staff and has a reputation as a tough marketers. republ
to be stress relief. >> reporter: experts say more education is needed to help young women make wise choices about whether they should drink alcohol and how much. rehema ellis, nbc news, new york. >>> and we're back in a moment with the night the luck o' the irish ran out. ♪ chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. >>> we learned overnight one of the great nonfiction writers of our times, richard ben cramer, has died. if you were a young journalist in this country wanting to know how best to cover politics, campaigns and politicians, richard cramer's book "what it takes" it all it took. it chronicled the 1988 campaign as it focused on bush 41, on bush 41, dukakis, biden and all the educated at johns hopkins and columbia. richard ben cramer died of lung cancer at the age of 62. >>> well, you know how they say roll tide. the tide certainly rolled right over notre dame last night as alabama owned the bcs college championship game. from the get-go there were sad irish eyes all over this today. a 42-14 thumping for the
. he challenged u.s. power and made friends with enemies. among the educated middle class, he is profoundly unpopular, hated by many and even feared. that oncologist in the country's leading cancer clinic says that violent crime has swept of venezuela. >> a number of my colleagues go around in vehicles, very scared for their lives. every week, one of my friends' families is hit by a kidnapper. that is the terror that we live in. >> in the face of his loyalty, the opposition seems weekend. they dropped their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would b
aspect. that is education. i think of the national level or state level rules for sort of outcomes in education. i'm looking at this map and as you pointed out, not only is it is map where crime is in the city, it's a map where you have low performing schools. ought we not put lead on top of our outcomes and not saying you have to close your school because you are dealing with students who are lead poisoned. >> correct. the mapping of a city is really easy to do. it's much -- ethically, it's more important to do something like that where you get at the source than measure blood level. we use the child to indicate what is environment is like and try to turn it around to primary prevention in measuring the environment and try to prevent the child from getting exposed. it turns out soil is very easy to measure the amount of lead in soil. we are doing a lot of work in the city of new orleans to try to advance changing the environment so that children don't get exposed. >> i really appreciate that shift. rather than thinking of the kid as the problem, we think of the environment. thank
in the budget plan is public education which will get more than $2.5 billion extra to fund k-12 and community college education. the uc and csu systems get an additional $250 million each. it calls for change to the program that transfers long-term care if adults to counties. the governor is calling for $1 billion reserve fund. brown said the state must still live in its means. >> i am here to get done what is compassionate, what is good for the state of california, and what we can maintain over time rather than just enjoying the momentary high. >> the state still faces a $1.9 billion deficit but brown will benefit from voter-approved tax increases and austerity measures forcing deep cuts to all state services during the last budget cycle. >> right now in washington, president obama has officially nominated jack lew for treasury secretary. that announcement was made last than half an hour ago. he is if line to replace geithner. last year, he was chosen to be the president's chief of staff and has a reputation as a tough marketers. republicans claim he is few unyielding in past fiscal negotiat
are carrying messages of jihad. but it's not what you might think. it's a campaign to try to educate residents about the real meaning of the word. it began in chicago. it's now reached the bay area. abc7 news reporter explains. >> my jihad is to stay fit debite my busy schedule. what's yours? that's the statement on the side of this muni bus. it's part of an educational campaign created by c.a.r.e., the council on american islamic relations. the group has put 35ads on buses rolling through san francisco. >> the intention of the campaign is to educate our fellow americans about what the word jihad means. >> she is the executive director of c.a.r.e.'s bay area office. >> a common misconception of the word jihad is it means armed struggle or holy war. and that is something that has been perpetrated by many who have made careers out of pushing anti-muslim sentiment. >> i asked muni riders if they knew the definition of jihad. >> religious war. >> a holy war. >> webster defines it as a holy war, but there's a second definition that is more appropriate. >> the proper meaning, as many of us describe
brown's budget calls for increased funding for education, $2.7 million more and $250 million more to the csu and uc systems. the increase is made possible by voters who approved tax hikes under proper 30. he warned the surplus could disappear based on federal actions, cutting the national debt or healthcare costs. democrats say the plan mirrors their own but they are eyeing rebuilding the social safety net. >> we are in this middle ground area, no more cuts. >> reporter: the leader of the democrats in the senate pointed january is not may. in may the governor will release his budget which we could see the surplus disappeared or see that it has grown, in which cases democrats may restore afunding to social -- funding to social service cuts. ken pritchett,. >> reporter: >> more details. the state estimates it will have a surplus of $851 million. it drops down for 2014. but then it increases to 400 million the next year. it is projected at a billion dollars for the 2016 year. >> restore. rebuild. >> after governor jerry brown announced the plan protesters gathered at city hall. this
, education. especially to our youth, we have to educate them about what a concussion is. we don't have to be unconscious. less than 10% of concussions result in unconsciousness. so what the symptoms are. and then, two, when they have a concussion, know that it's okay not to play. if you don't feel complete, don't compete. if you don't feel right in the head, rest instead. i think that's the message that our youth needs to hear. that it's okay, that toughness is like a badge of honor, so it's understandable that they want to continue to play. but when it comes to the brain trauma, it's a completely different issue. >> right, you can replace a kneecap and move on, but you cannot do that with a brain. i want to add into the conversation. paul callan, our legal analyst, and david epstein. how significant are these findings when it comes to the nfl? there are 2,000 players who now have lawsuits against the nfl? is this something that could be do or die for the league? >> i think everybody sort of expected to see cte in junior seau. i think we sort of know that story, when somebody's played
to know what you think. >>> coming up, teachers and guns. we'll talk to an educator who wants to protect her students with a concealed weapon in school. find out if she is worried what parents might think. stay with us. we're right back. ♪ [ male announcer ] born from the elements, destined to take them over. ♪ the sirius xm satellite radio in the 2013 ram 1500. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >>> the newtown school shooting has sparked a nationwide debate over whether teachers should carry concealed weapons in schools. a new poll shows most americans think arming teachers is the wrong answer. only 27% want teachers to carry firearms. 64% oppose it. but it's easy to understand why parents would not want a gun in their child's classroom. in 2010, guns killed seven children and young adults every single day in america. that's an average of seven people between the ages of 1 and 24 getting shot and killed every day in america. guns killed more kids than cancer, heart disease, flu, or infection in 2010. but gu
'll talk to an educator who wants to protect her students with a concealed weapon in school. find out if she is worried what parents might think. stay with us. we're right back. [ male announcer ] house rule number 14. a great cup of coffee should be easy as one, two... well, just one. new single serve cafe collections from maxwell house now available for use in the keurig k-cup brewer. always good to the last drop. is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. >>> the newtown school shooting has sparked a nationwide debate over whether teachers should carry concealed weapons in schools. a new poll shows most americans think arming teachers is the wrong answer. only 27% want teachers to carry firearms. 64% oppose it. but it's easy to understand why parents would not want a gun in their child's classroom. in 2010, guns killed seven children and young adults every single day in america. that's an average of seven people between the ages of 1 and 24 gettin
incorporate themselves into the whole education process, because they don't have the ability to maximize all the education they're receiving because they can't go to college or they feel like they can't do this because they don't have a social security card or can't apply for financial aid. it seems like, i'm going to go to work in a few minutes, and a lot of my kids are going to learn what i'm going to teach today and they won't feel like they can do anything with it. host: has it changed since the -- since president obama announced this defered deportation -- >> caller: i have a few -- a lot of the kids i teach aren't old enough yesterday to apply for the document. i teach middle school, but a lot of them are looking at the document as a way to get around that. but it's just the fact that, you know, we have people that i hear every day, and, you know, they were brought here -- everybody was brought here, you know what i mean? it just doesn't seem like we should be able to find a way to fully incorporate them. you know, just find a way to make them citizens just like and you myself and we c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 370 (some duplicates have been removed)